Walking restarted

Walking restarted

Core tip: The researchers measured the walking speed of 35,000 participating elders and found that the faster they walked, the longer their life span.

According to statistics, 87% of elderly men who walk fast are 10 years longer than those who walk slowly; 91% of women who walk faster live 10 years longer than walk slowly.

  According to the research results of American researchers, the pace may predict the longevity of human beings. Scientists have found that the elderly who go faster can substitute for longevity than the slower ones.

The study’s report was published last week in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

  Researchers measured the walking speed of 35,000 elders (both men and women over 75 years old) who participated in the study, and found that the faster they walked, the longer their lives.

According to statistics, 87% of elderly men who walk fast are 10 years longer than those who walk slowly; 91% of women who walk faster live 10 years longer than walk slowly.

  However, the performance of Stephanie Studenski, a geriatrics expert at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in charge of this study, does not mean that increasing walking speed can increase life span, because “your body will automatically choose the right fit for youThe speed of personal health. ”

  However, scientists say doctors may consider testing a patient’s pace to determine his health.

Another early research report pointed out that walking speed can indeed improve the survival rate of people over the age of 65.

Seth Landefeld, director of the University of California Center for Aging Research, said in Discovery News that testing walking speed is particularly helpful for examining cancer and cardiovascular disease.

  The results of earlier scientific reports all show that for middle-aged and elderly people, wearing sports shoes and going for a walk is one of the best ways to maintain a healthy and long life.

Among them, one study pointed out that walking 9 a week.

5 kilometers can ensure more sensitive brain activity, while Harvard University research suggests that women can reduce the risk of stroke by more than 40% as long as they often walk or walk at brisk pace.